Mallat Integral

1950s
About This Model

Mallat was one of the major fountain pen manufacturers in France from World War I until well after World War II, building from roots in the late 1800s. They made ebonite pens, starting with the Regulier eyedropper, the Sureté safety filler, and the Automatic lever filler. Mallat shifted to celluloid in the 1930s, with lever and button fillers, producing standard French pens.
In the 1930s, Mallat introduced the accordion filler, in part to control costs, as well as to respond to public demand to see ink in the pen. The Integral, which first appeared in celluloid in 1936 with a glass topped accordion sac. Their post WWII success was found with plastic pens, the Plexigraph piston models, and with Integrals, now with plastic tops on the accordion fillers.
Mallat, as a sinking move, purchased the moribund but formerly elegant Edacoto brand in the 1960s, but the move did not succeed. Mallat was purchased by a multinational firm in the late 1960s and the brand disappeared.

About This Pen

This is one of those pens that might have joined my collection, if it weren’t for its nib, which needs right-handed writing to extract its full advantages. This is the largest Mallat Integral I’ve seen, at 13.9cm and girth to match. It is in deep red plastic, with the red extending to the end of the French tapered section. The surface is very nice, unscratched; it restored very nicely. This pen is an accordion filler, so it has a blind cap, under which is found the plastic vial that fills with ink above the sac. Its trim is gold, either very good plate or gold-filled. The clip is evocative of the 1950s French Waterman/JIF “New Look” pens, starting at the very top of the cap and sloping down. “Mallat Integral” is imprinted in the barrel, and is complete. The nib, a fine with some flex, is marked “Mallat”, “4” and “18cts”. A very nice example of a pen that was common in France in its day but not often seen here in the US. Treat this pen to a case to maintain its finish.

This pen is not for sale.