LeBoeuf 70

1920s
About This Model

LeBoeufs have long been among the most desirable and least available American fountain pens. The LeBoeuf Fountain Pen Company was founded in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1920, and gone by 1933, but in its thirteen years produced beautiful and innovative pens. The founder developed a process of building pens from celluloid tube, rather than sheet and rods, which probably enabled the use of celluloids that were often simply stunning. In addition, LeBoeuf developed a unique sleeve filling method that they marketed in 1931 as “Unbreakable”. LeBoeuf pens are highly desirable, and the larger sleeve fillers are among the most prized and expensive vintage pens one can find.

About This Pen

This LeBoeuf is a lever-filler, just under 5” long capped, in brown and gold with iridescence in the celluloid. It is beautiful, shiny, nearly unmarked. The cap has a black celluloid crown, and the number 70, probably to indicate the model, is engraved in the barrel’s base. The gold clip and lever are both engraved with LeBoeuf. The barrel imprint is deep and complete; “Unbreakable, LeBoeuf Fountain Pen Co, patent May 19-19, Springfield, Mass”. Curiously, there is no cap ring, but there is a deep indented ring; the cap ring isn’t missing, this was their style. The nib is a LeBoeuf 4, and it writes a firm, wet fine to extra fine.

Price: $420